There is no doubt in my mind that, had I made my boss aware of the pregnancy, the other candidate would have been offered the job

One of my team applied for a temporary promotion.   She was eminently suitable for the position so , in line with our internal policy at the time, I endorsed her application.  I knew she was pregnant but she had asked me to keep it to myself.  After interview there were two candidates in the frame for the post, my nominee and another.  I was asked by my manager if I thought she would be suitable for the post.  I said honestly that I thought she would be an excellent choice.   My team member was offered the promotion, however, I was told afterwards that I should have made my manager aware of her pregnancy (broken a confidence – against company policy)  or not recommended her for the post (in other words, lied).  There is no doubt in my mind that, had I made my boss aware of the pregnancy, the other candidate would have been offered the job.  As a matter of interest, up to that time I was identified as having high potential.  After the event I noticed a change in the opportunities offered to me.  I was labelled as being “unreliable”, not “corporate” enough.  Incidentally, the lady in question made a brilliant success of her promotion and on her return from maternity leave has been promoted twice.

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