They didn’t understand that my partner was entitled to ‘paternity’ leave… but we sort of understood that as we were the first same-sex couple they had had having a child,

My partner and I are a same-sex female couple. My partner changed jobs while i was trying to conceive and so when i was due to have our child (our 2nd child) she had only been in her job around 12 months. The company were a family business but did have a fairly large number of employees, probably over 100. They were not very up to date on employment law though (which came as a shock to us, having always worked for large national organisations). They didn’t understand that my partner was entitled to ‘paternity’ leave… but we sort of understood that as we were the first same-sex couple they had had having a child,they might not know this and we didn’t mind, we pointed out the legislation to them and they agreed. They then kept pushing my partner to say what the exact date would be that it would start… and she kept saying, this is our due date but obviously it could be any day give or take a week or so (men in the office were not put under this pressure). in the end i was actually given a planned C-section with a date, so my partner told them.. ‘it will be this date’. They then completely out of the blue 1 week before this paternity leave date called her in to the office and made her redundant with a months notice. My partner got legal advice on this through the union and in the end with their help managed to negotiate an extra month out of them if she signed a document saying she wouldn’t take them to court. This made the period before the birth and for several months after really really stressful, and completely overshadowed a time that should have been a special time. My partner was working 4 days a week locally, and in the end had to find a job a 2 hr commute away working full time hours, meaning i had much less support, and she saw both our kids a lot less. We think they did this as they were already not happy she was 4 days a week (they had employed her on this basis), and the paternity leave pushed them over the edge… they favoured ‘young’ single men.

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